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Hip Dysplasia

Sometimes known as congenital hip dislocation or hip dysplasia, development dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is where the ball and socket joint of the hips don't correctly form in young children or babies.

Our hip is where the top of the thigh bone joins our pelvis in cup and ball joint configuration. DDH is where the socket is too shallow for the ball to sit, resulting in a loose fit. In severe cases, the hip joint may dislocate.

1 or 2 in 1,000 babies born may have DDH that requires treatment, and it is more common in girls than boys.

Read more: Hip Dysplasia
Hip Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of a disease that affects your joints causing stiffness and pain. Osteoarthritis is a global disease, and at least 8 million people in the UK suffer from the condition. Affecting one or both hips, Osteoarthritis in the hip is prevalent.

Read more: Hip Osteoarthritis
Hip Osteoarthritis

Surgery of any type has the potential for infection - including hip replacements. Bacteria can attach to and around the area of the new prosthesis and present as a problem in the hospital, after going home and in some cases, many years later.

The most common symptom being the pain, but the implant may also lose attachment to the bone causing instability and loss of mobility.

Read more: Infected Hip Replacements
Infected Hip Replacements

Surgery of any type has the potential for infection - including knee replacements. Bacteria can attach to and around the area of the new implants and present as a problem in the hospital, after going home and in some cases, many years later.

The most common symptom being the pain, but the implant may also lose attachment to the bone causing instability and loss of mobility.

Read more: Infected Knee Replacements
Knee Meniscal tear

Cartilage allows bones to move over one another smoothly and acts as a shock absorber. Although robust and flexible, knee cartilage damage is a common injury, typically caused by trauma in sports or the development of osteoarthritis.

Read more: Knee Cartilage damage
Knee Meniscal tear

The cartilage that provides a cushion between your femur (thighbone) and tibia (shinbone) is known as the meniscus, and each knee joint has two.

During activities that rotate or put pressure on the knee such as a hard rugby tackle or sudden netball pivot, the meniscus can tear or be damaged.

Read more: Knee Meniscal tear
Knee Osteoarthritis

Due to the stresses and strains we all put on our knees, Osteoarthritis of the knee is common. Osteoarthritis affects the cartilage underneath your kneecap (patella) and the main surfaces of your knee joint.

Read more: Knee Osteoarthritis
Hip Osteoarthritis

A total hip replacement, allowing people to live active lives without pain, is one of the most successful medical procedures. However, over time, a hip replacement can fail, and your doctor may recommend a second procedure called revision total hip replacement.

The goal is the same, but revision hip replacement is a more extended, more complicated procedure requiring extensive planning and specialised tools and implants.

Read more: Primary hip replacement failure
Total knee replacement failure

A total knee replacement, allowing people to live active lives without pain, is one of the most successful medical procedures. However, over time, a knee replacement can fail, and your doctor may recommend a second procedure called revision knee replacement.

The goal is the same, but revision knee replacement is a more extended, more complicated procedure requiring extensive planning and specialised tools and implants.

Read more: Total knee replacement failure